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RUMOR: Browns Trading for Fabian Washington

No 1st round pick.
No 2nd round pick.
No 3rd round pick.
No...5th round pick?

According to Evan Silva or RotoWorld, the Browns could be working a trade with the Oakland Raiders. The Browns would send their 5th round pick to the Raiders in exchange for cornerback Fabian Washington. On ESPN this morning, when asked about what to expect from the Cleveland Browns this weekend, analyst Jeremy Green said to expect another trade for the Browns, this time for CB Fabian Washington.

Acquiring Washington would be another steal for the Browns, especially if all it costs us if a fifth-round pick.


Fabian Washington

#27 / Cornerback / Oakland Raiders

5-11

185

Jun 08, 1983

Nebraska


Washington was the 23rd overall pick in the 2005 draft. Because the Raiders were able to acquire DeAngelo Hall in the offseason, and since Nnamdi Asomugha will play in the other starting cornerback position, the Raiders have made it clear that Washington is expendable. Whether or not Washington gets dealt to the Browns, as rumored, or to another team, is up in the air.

On March 31, 2008, Tony Grossi wrote that Washington wasn't on the Browns' radar:

OAKLAND CORNER NOT ON BROWNS RADAR: Although the Raiders and Browns have exchanged e-mails about a possible trade for Oakland cornerback Fabian Washington, it doesn't sound as if a deal is in the works. The Browns were told that Oakland has an offer of a second-round pick on the table for the former No. 1 draft pick. The Browns, of course, do not have a pick available higher than the fourth-round and they are not even sure they would give that up for Washington.

Whether or not things have changed since then remains to be seen, considering the two rumors we've heard about today. Washington did have an arrest of domestic battery back in February that could certainly lower his value. Also, remember that Pacman Jones was dealt to the Dallas Cowboys for just a fourth-round draft pick (although his controversies were much more severe than Washington's).