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Raiders vs. Browns: Analyzing the Snap Counts (Offense)

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Looking at the offensive snap counts in the Browns' 23-13 victory over the Raiders.

Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

The Browns' offense wasn't pretty, but they avoided turning the ball over and came through with two touchdowns in the fourth quarter against an Oakland team that was ready to defend the run. Check out the snap distributions below for the offense, and let us know what your reactions are in the comments section.


Offensive Line
Joe Thomas Joel Bitonio
Nick McDonald
John Greco
Mitchell Schwartz
100%
56/56 plays
100%
56/56 plays
100%
56/56 plays
100%
56/56 plays
100%
56/56 plays

Thoughts: All five starters played the entire game. C Nick McDonald made his first start of the season (and his first since 2011), as the Browns took OG Paul McQuistan out of the lineup and returned OG John Greco to right guard. The unit allowed just one sack on the day but still clearly had issues, particularly with their run blcoking.


Running Back / Fullback
Ben Tate
Kiero Small Terrance West Isaiah Crowell Donte Whitner
55%
31/56 plays
45%
25/56 plays
39%
22/56 plays
5%
3/56 plays
2%
1/56 plays

Ben Tate: 15 carries, 26 yards, 1.7 YPC, 1 touchdown. 1 catch, 8 yards (1 target).
Kiero Small: No stats registered.
Terrance West: 7 carries, 11 yards, 1.6 YPC. 1 catch, 10 yards (2 targets).
Isaiah Crowell: 1 carry, 1 yard, 1.0 YPC. 1 catch, 8 yards (1 target).

Thoughts: When you factor in all of the Browns' rushes, the team averaged 1.56 yards per carry against a poor Raiders run defense. The 39 yards rushing were the fewest the Browns had since Week 3 of the 2012 season, when they had just 33 yards rushing against the Bills (but their YPC average was a little better that day). Unlike last week, I don't pin the blame on the running backs this week: the run blocking has gone to hell since Alex Mack's injury.

FB Kiero Small played his first game of the season replacing Ray Agnew, and he played nearly half the game. The Browns let SS Donte Whitner be the deep back on the final play of the game (victory formation kneeldown).


Wide Receiver
Andrew Hawkins Miles Austin Taylor Gabriel Travis Benjamin
75%
42/56 plays
70%
39/56 plays
68%
38/56 plays
27%
15/56 plays

Andrew Hawkins: 7 catches, 88 yards (9 targets), 1 touchdown.
Miles Austin: 2 catches, 34 yards (2 targets).
Taylor Gabriel: 2 catches, 60 yards (3 targets).
Travis Benjamin: 0 catches (2 targets).

Thoughts: This was a week of redemption for the wide receivers, as this unit did not have any dropped passes that I can recall and caught most of the targets thrown their way. Even though Travis Benjamin didn't have a catch, he did a great job breaking up a would-be interception on a deep ball. Miles Austin made a couple of clutch catches, Taylor Gabriel is a waterbug on the catch-and-runs, and Andrew Hawkins continues to get the most separation due to his quickness.


Tight End
Gary Barnidge Jim Dray Jordan Cameron
43%
24/56 plays
41%
23/56 plays
30%
17/56 plays

Jordan Cameron: 3 catches, 40 yards (5 targets).
Jim Dray: 2 catches, 27 yards (2 targets).
Gary Barnidge: 0 catches (1 target).

Thoughts: The Browns used both Gary Barnidge and Jim Dray equally after the concussion suffered by Jordan Cameron. Clearly, a big part of Cleveland's gameplan this week was to throw the ball to Cameron. Out of Brian Hoyer's first 12 pass attempts, Cameron was targeted on five of them. He left at the beginning of the second quarter.


Quarterback
Brian Hoyer
100%
56/56 plays

Brian Hoyer: 19-of-28 (67.86%) for 275 yards, 1 touchdown. 2 carries, 1 yard.

Thoughts: Statistically, Brian Hoyer appears to have had a sharp day. He had his second highest completion percentage of the season and didn't turn the ball over. His completion rate was a true indicator that he was more accurate this week, but it also conceals the fact that Hoyer made more bad throws or decisions than I've seen all season. The Raiders easily dropped what most defenses would have turned into 3 or 4 interceptions. It can't be easy not having the support of a running game, though, and Hoyer continues to demonstrate that he can mentally move on from the mistakes that he makes.